Friday, February 22, 2013

An open letter to Husqvarna Viking: The Response

I know many of you have been asking about my sewing machine troubles and what has happened since I posted my letter to Husqvarna Viking back in July. You can read the letter here.

Two weeks after I posted this letter to my blog, I got a phone call from the regional manager for my area. She apologized for my inconvenience and offered to give me a brand new Sapphire 835 (the same machine I was having trouble with) in box. All I needed to do was contact my local store and they would have it for me to pick up in a few days. I contacted the store and was met with disbelief in my claim, so I had to call back to the regional manager to ask her to contact the store so I could make arrangements. It took another four weeks and multiple trips up to the store before I got my new machine. I was told the machine would be ready to pick up on three separate occasions when the machine was not actually in store. I needed to trade in my existing machine when I picked up, so all these times not only was a lugging a heavy machine in and out of the store, I also had my daughter with me. The fourth time I was contacted for machine delivery, the machine they had for me was not new in box, as I was promised. It was in a box, but it was NOT new. The box was tore up badly enough for me to want to open it right there in the store. Once opened, I found the manual torn and crumpled, shoved in a space it clearly didn't belong in. The cords were not wrapped well and the styrofoam was damaged. Initially, the new manager (the old manager, Clarrisa, left for a new job opportunity) told me that was how it was supposed to be and that it was, in fact, new in box. I refused the machine and asked for a different one. I left the store again and waited for the next call. When I finally got the call the new machine was in, I opened this one in store as well, just to be sure it was in fact "new". It was in pristine condition, everything as it should be. It was ever more clear that the previous machine was NOT new and the manager apologized for her insistence on the contrary. I made the swap and took the machine home.

I'd been sewing on it for a few months when I decided I needed a reliable machine. This new Viking had the same tension issues as the last, the bobbin thread showing on top no matter how many different ways I changed the top thread tension (since there is no way to change the bobbin tension on this Viking) and the top thread nesting on the bottom at random intervals (though happening most often after the machine had been in use for a while.) I did not have the top thread becoming tangled in the internal workings of the machine this time and there was no loud noise, but it still did not work well enough to be worth the money I paid for it.

I had to stop quilting all Comfort Quilts as the machine would skip stitches and the top thread would nest on the back of my quilts. I had to unpick more than one quilt, which anyone who quilts can tell you, is the worst kind of torture!

I had a friend over to teach beginning quilting lessons. Lots of skipped stitched. Lots of loops. Lots of nests. Lots of thread breaking.

I had another, seasoned quilter friend over to use my machine to quilt her do.Good Stitches quilt. Same issues. Lots of loops, nests and skipped stitches.

As I was working on my heart quilt, I couldn't even use this machine! I needed a zig zag or applique stitch to adhere the hearts to my blocks. No such luck. The outcome was horrendous. I ended up borrowing a friend's little $80 Shark machine to stitch all 272 of my hearts. My machine retails for closer to $1,800.

Ultimately, I was tired of my Viking. Tired of not knowing if it was going to give me good stitches or bad. Tired of not being able to do any real quilting because I was afraid I would have to pick out all my hard work. Tired of broken thread (yes, even Aurifil), broken needles and shoddy work. I decided to buy a new machine.

I bought a Juki TL-2010Q from a local dealer and it has been an amazing purchase. I spent $850 on this straight stitch only machine and it has been worth every penny. The walking foot it came with is terrible, but the machine itself is fantastic. The tension was tricky to figure out at first, but after reading the manual thoroughly and playing with the tension settings, I have a much better handle on it now. The Juki sews great, so quiet at times I have to stop and check to make sure I'm still sewing and the bobbin hasn't run out! Aurifil on this machine is absolutely dreamy. The motor runs smooth and can handle long work sessions. I've only done a few small, practice bits of FMQ on it, but just from the little bit I've done I can tell it is leaps and bounds better than my Viking, which can't do FMQ at all. It says it can, but it can't.

I have to keep the Viking because the Juki can't do anything other than straight stitching, although, since the Viking couldn't even zig zag long enough to applique one heart (oh yes. It quit working as I was trying to stitch) I think I would rather find another good quality machine to take the Viking's place. The Viking also has a free-arm, which means any garment sewing will have to be done on it too. Scary.

I cannot even tell you how disheartened I am about this Viking machine and their products. I had really hoped my first machine was just a lemon. I take good care of my machines, cleaning and changing the needles often and using good quality fabrics and threads.

If you have any questions about how either of these machines is working, please don't hesitate to ask. I'm sure there are many other aspects of the machines I have forgotten to mention here.


Danny

60 comments:

  1. Oh Danny, what a nightmare. It sucks that you had to fight so much to get a new machine that's still sub-par. I'm glad your Juki was a good buy, it's just awful that you had to buy it at all!

    ReplyDelete
  2. I would think that Viking should give you a 100% refund which would allow you to buy a reliable machine that did the stitches you wanted without a constant worry that you would be unpicking more than you would be sewing. I shall never even consider a Viking based on your report. If you ever get the chance I can recommend Bernina as being reliable, consistent in the various stitches and easy to maintain.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I've been wondering how you got on. I have problems with my Viking sapphire too, but nothing like yours. I have the opposite tension problem, in that the top thread always shows through the bottom. The automatic cut has never worked properly, and the auto threaded wont work, although Gordon says that's probably my fault for sewing on a pin, or breaking a needle when I've forgotten to change to the right foot!. It's very temperamental, and I am constantly cleaning, retreading, I thought about buying a closed foot plate as it gobbles up fabric if its thin, or when I start the corner of a triangle. I'm torn between battling on and swapping it in part exchange for something else.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have the exact same problem with my sapphire 870. Drives me mad!

      Delete
    2. I used to have a problem until I discovered a 'flaw in the design'. Here is the letter I wrote to Husqvarna. Hi, I'm trying to get in touch with the servicing/designing people for Husqvarna. I think there is a design flaw with Sapphire 870 which is really simple - and would be easily rectified - if only they found it. I don't want to make a big fuss, but am prepared to if necessary. Those of us who use these machines bought them and sometimes are in love with them - but get frustrated with shredded threads. The cause is NOT the thread jumping out of the uptake lever, or the wrong needle, thread or tension. Instead, it is that the thread gets stuck in the join between the front and back of the machine, on its way from the uptake lever and the needle. If there were any addition of a metal bar, or a clip/hook, this problem could be prevented. Please see my photo. The thread gets stuck and consequently shredded. I look forward to your response. Julie (pm HV Sewing machines AUstralia, facebook page) 26/11/14 (I have a photo that helps clarify - but can't upload it onto here). Since then, I have sat with my technician, in front of my machine, and together we could not find a picture of what it SHOULD be like. However, the senior tech in Australia got back to my technician within 24 hours of this letter, and explained that a part was missing. There should be a metal bar across the bottom of the feed-lever-groove. It took hours for the technician to insert - but it was worth it. I can now sew whatever I like, beautifully. I always adjust the tension back to 'normal' after I've set the free-motion settings. Superior Threads have really informative videos on their website about threads, needles and tension. There should have been a product recall about this model of the machine - I guess it's up to us as customers to demand that we have functional machines.

      Delete
  4. Bummer Danny! I would trade in your new Viking for another machine. Because it is so new, you could get a lot for it. Good luck!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Wow, that stinks! If they won't give you your money back, I'll bet you can trade it in or pop it on Craigslist/eBay and get some money for a new machine.

    I've got an old Bernina (it's a 930 Record--so I think it's from about 1982). It doesn't have the bells and whistles that a lot of other machines do, but it's been a solid workhorse for me. I really love it! Good luck on finding a machine that meets your needs and has better customer service!

    ReplyDelete
  6. Wow! I can only imagine how frustrated you are! I always thought Vikings were really good machines. That's so sad. I've had a Bernina for about 12 years. I love it's reliability. No matter what brand, when you pay that much money you expect it to work...for a long, long time!

    ReplyDelete
  7. It seems like all of the machines that used to be high quality are now junk. I remember everyone telling me if I bought a Pfaff I'd never regret it. The one I got was $1000. Within a month I took it back (tension, skipped stitches, foot pedal issues, you name it this machine had it) and went a step up to the $1200 machine. I WISH I had gone with whatever Brother they had in that price range because I've had nothing but issues with this Pfaff also but when I took it in they sew on it for a minute and say "operator error". I finally quit taking it in. I have figured out that the only thread I can use to FMQ on it with no issues is that super slick polyester machine embroidery thread so that's something I guess.

    I'm thinking of buying a cheap little brother (under $200) to piece on and then only using the Pfaff for my quilting. I sewed with a cheap Brother for years, never serviced it, never even oiled it and never had a single issue with it. Crazy. You spend a mint on a "good" sewing machine and get nothing but headaches! Hope you find something you love!

    ReplyDelete
  8. I really wish you'd have had better luck. I don't understand store managers who don't believe their customers.
    I bought a new Pfaff anniversary edition last September. I was not offered the free 8 hour "get to know your machine" until December but I rearranged my schedule and took the class. The number one thing she said regarding tension was when you get ready to replace your thread, cut the thread by the spool and pull the thread from the bottom (by the needle). It will not only pull out lint but it will keep the thread flowing "with" the tension do-dahs in the machine.
    Are you completely through trying to work out something with Viking? It seems as if you need to keep trying (as painful as that might be).
    Good luck!

    ReplyDelete
  9. I have been having the SAME EXACT problem with my used Viking Lily. It was totally fine until about 6 months ago when the tension just crapped out! I kept taking it in to the Viking Service guy that visits my town once a week and he kept insisting that it was fixed because it would work fine when he had it but then it wouldn't when I got it home. He would give me these looks like I was crazy and I obviously didn't know what I was doing. I would spend hours in tears from frustration!!! I finally had to borrow a machine to get my projects done. He finally told me that IF there WAS something wrong with the tension discs, to repair it would cost close to half of buying a new one!!!! What?! Thank you for sharing your struggles. Obviously I wouldn't be able to have mine replaced because it was a product of the 90's but I may need to start saving up to buy a different brand machine. Disappointing.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Nightmare! Is it too late to take it back again?

    ReplyDelete
  11. Oh crap, sorry things didn't get better :o( There's a certain amount of 'you get what you pay for,' but I do recall that Brother's machines are basically the same as a high end model, rebadged and cheaper! I know I've seen my NX2000 as something else on someone's blog, but IIRC, Lee from Freshly Pieced was looking for a machine and found a few brands were like that. I've never had a problem with my Brother, and it does amazingly good quilting, especially FMQ, and you never have to touch the tension. Mine was £1,300, which would be about $2k if that helps (and I bought it the day it came out, so I imagine the price should have gone down a bit)

    ReplyDelete
  12. PS, here's Lee's research with prices:

    http://www.freshlypieced.com/2012/07/sewing-machine-shopping-what-i-learned.html

    ReplyDelete
  13. Been there, done that. I had a similar issue with Viking. I finally went out and got a Janome (although I looked at 2 Juki's), and a few months afterward, Viking decided to let me trade out my machine that wasn't working. At this point, I use the "new" Viking just for piecing and to let my 6 year old learn to sew. I was pretty disappointed in Viking too, I had always heard that they were a reputable company. But times do change.

    Best wishes to you and your Juki in your new life together! (sounds like a marriage to me).

    ReplyDelete
  14. yikes! I'm sorry your experience was not pleasant. I tried out a Viking during my shopping days, but I wasn't too impressed with it. I'm so happy you love your Juki though!!

    ReplyDelete
  15. I'm so sorry to hear about your Viking! I was wondering about your Juki, though -- did you get an alternate walking foot? I have the 2000Qi and did think it sounded rather clunky, but haven't looked into getting a different one yet. :}

    ReplyDelete
  16. I wanted to weigh in just because I have NOT had that experience with my Sapphire 830. I saw many reviews AFTER I purchased mine that complain about the tension problems throughout the Sapphire 830-850-875 line. If I had read those reviews before my purchase, I would have been scared off. That being said, I feel very lucky that mine works correctly (knock on wood). The only issue I have with tension is that I need to turn to the top of the recommended range (if it recommends 4-6, I use 6) to get a proper stitch. I did read somewhere that country of manufacture may make a difference. Mine was made in Sweden. I understand some were made in China. The metal plate underneath the machine shows where it was made. Viking rather quickly replaced with 830-850-870s with the 835-855-875s, which I suspected was to correct the widely experienced tension problems. And yet your 835 has the same problem. Regardless, your experience in trying to get a working machine is horrifying. A manufacturer needs to stand behind its product. I love my machine, but from everything I've read, I am not loving Viking as a company. It seems like they produced a poorly made model and tried very hard not to have to take them all back. If I ever need to upgrade, I'll definitely check all the reviews and all the manufacturers. Had I not read these widely reported complaints, Viking would have been a lock to sell me my next machine.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Glad you are happy with the Juki. So sad HV have been less than helpful. I have found exactly the same problems when dealing with HV dealers here in Australia. Blessington will say one thing, and the dealers will duck, dive, weave, and avoid you like the plaque once they have your money.

    No follow-up, no allowance for the tyranny of distance (I live over two hours from the nearest dealer, work part time, make quilts as a sideline, help on the farm and have a family. But that's not the point, we ALL deserve decent service, whether we have to make a five hour round trip, or walk five minutes to the dealer!), I was never even given basic lessons or shown how to operate the Diamond!

    Yes, I *could* have lessons, but the girl who gave them was away, and could I book into the next round of classes?
    Well, no. We will be cutting hay and then harvesting grain. Can you show me now?
    Aahhhh, sorry. I'm not familiar with the HV range.
    What... you work for the reseller!

    Yes, I know. Stupid me. I should have walked away then and there.

    Like you, I was told it was operator incompetence or bad thread when my Platinum 770 was looping, skipping, pulling and otherwise misbehaving while FMQ. Aurifil would not like to be called 'cheap' or 'bad'.

    Like you, I was stuffed around by the dealer until the warranty ran out when my Diamond had issues. I was told to sell the Diamond, and upgrade to the Diamond Deluxe! The damn thing cost my loving family a small fortune, and I was expected to palm it of to some unsuspecting sucker; and then spend even more money with the dealer that had stuffed me about until I had to contact Blessington and have them sort it.

    In the end, I sourced a private repairman, and send all my machines to him for servicing, tweaks and repairs. No more issues and the machines run perfectly.

    I don't know where the problems lie, but since my machines now both run like a charm, I suspect the problem is with the company.

    The machines can be repaired, tweaked or replaced. The good name of HV cannot.

    Very very sad.

    Phew, feels good to get that out of the system :-)

    ReplyDelete
  18. I also have had problems with my Saphire although not to the extent that you have ....I can use my machine but I have to constantly "baby" it by stopping adjusting cleaning etc. I would NOT recommend this machine to anyone. Shame on your local dealer.

    ReplyDelete
  19. Very sad. Like the others, I won't consider HV in the future. I have two machines. [1] a Janome that I paid about $400 for in 2006. It works like a charm, and is very portable, traveling wherever I need it to go and [2] a Kenmore that is a Janome at heart. I don't know how old it is . . . it was given to me by a friend, who received it from another friend. Both do great work for sewing and quilting. The only issue with them is that the little clip that keeps the thread from slipping off the take up lever no longer works on either one. I did take one machine to the repair shop and he didn't fix it. So I used a small piece of duct tape and no more thread slipping off the take up lever.

    ReplyDelete
  20. Very sad. Like the others, I won't consider HV in the future. I have two machines. [1] a Janome that I paid about $400 for in 2006. It works like a charm, and is very portable, traveling wherever I need it to go and [2] a Kenmore that is a Janome at heart. I don't know how old it is . . . it was given to me by a friend, who received it from another friend. Both do great work for sewing and quilting. The only issue with them is that the little clip that keeps the thread from slipping off the take up lever no longer works on either one. I did take one machine to the repair shop and he didn't fix it. So I used a small piece of duct tape and no more thread slipping off the take up lever.

    ReplyDelete
  21. Very sad. Like the others, I won't consider HV in the future. I have two machines. [1] a Janome that I paid about $400 for in 2006. It works like a charm, and is very portable, traveling wherever I need it to go and [2] a Kenmore that is a Janome at heart. I don't know how old it is . . . it was given to me by a friend, who received it from another friend. Both do great work for sewing and quilting. The only issue with them is that the little clip that keeps the thread from slipping off the take up lever no longer works on either one. I did take one machine to the repair shop and he didn't fix it. So I used a small piece of duct tape and no more thread slipping off the take up lever.

    ReplyDelete
  22. What a nightmare....I have the Juki 98Q and LOVE, LOVE, LOVE it....it has got to be one of the best machines ever. I had seen one at a quilt show, but didn't sew on it or anything. Then, after trying to do another quilt on my Viking and Pfaff, I started researching between it and the Brother 1500 one...I joined a yahoo group for the the Juki 98 and read and read and read...at that time, I think I read about one person that had an actual lemon....anything else always was operator error. I took the plunge and ordered one without ever test driving it and have been in 7th heaven ever since. If you visit my Pics & Piecing blog, I have a page for quilts and you can see what I have done...

    Now my Pfaff was a tiptronic 1171 and I really loved that machine...never a single problem with it, except not enough room for me to maneuver a quilt under it. Then my daughter was needing a sewing machine so since it never gives a problem, I let her take it home...again something I never thought I would do.

    My Viking I bought used...it does NOT have issues like yours, though there are some minor ones I think just from age and used. Anyway, I just dying to get the Juki HZL F600...and I tell myself I don't need another machine but it doesn't stop me wanting it.

    ReplyDelete
  23. I had to take my Sapphire 830 in for service today. I was simply FED UP with the tension problems and thread breaking. This has been an issue since day one. I too took it back to the store twice, ling before the warranty was expired, but the woman at the store got the machine to work well enough, but not long after that, the problems started again. I hope it gets fixed. This is so frustrating!!

    ReplyDelete
  24. hey Danny,

    Interesting read.

    I have a Husqvarna 870 quilt (sapphire) and I hate it.
    I've had it about 6 years now, and I've only been able to use it properly over the last two years. It hates sewing two layers of cotton and bias binding, because it loops terribly on the back. Nothing I do to it fixes it. I complained to Husqvarna telling them after an internet search every hit I had just mentioning the 870 were complaining about the looping and the fact it can't handle zig zag let alone the fancy stitches. THey fobbed me off saying it needed a service, which would set me back £75.00 I haven't got. I said it's clearly a fault but they said a service would fix it. I disagreed saying everyone I had seen on the internet was told the same thing but services hadn't fixed it, instead they were found to be faulty machines. I can't get these people to agree to or admit anything. So frustrating.
    xx

    ReplyDelete
  25. Let me be specific about Viking and the company that owns it which is SVP Worldwide inc in LaVergne, Tn.

    1. First, SVP is owned by Kohlberg which is a holding company which should raise the reds flags. SVP Worldwide claims that they are based in Bermuda. That's right - Bermuda. What's wrong with this picture? It means it's doing whatever it can to hide assets and find tax shelters so the existence of this company isn't to service sewing but to play a shell game with finances.

    2. Husqavarna doesn't own Viking any longer. It sounds like it's part of one above but what it actually means is your Viking machine is now made in CHINA or VIETNAM so you don't have the refined Swedish workmanship. It's being put together in some sweat shop so quality goes right out the door. It's made CHEAP but sold as a quality unit to bring in profit at the expense of quality. Remember, the Viking company is owned by a holding company so only looking at making a cheap product with a quality name for high profits.

    3. Your Viking machine is being SUBCONTRACTED to Chinese and Vietnamese manufacturers. They don't even OWN or produce the Viking sewing machine. SVP Worldwide subcontracts it to the cheapest sweatshop in the Pacific Rim then slaps the Viking name to make you think you're buying a quality machine. You're being used as suckers. This also means any parts that go to your unit needs to be brought over on a boat which could take up to 3 to 6 months or longer. I mean longer because of financial issues.

    4. SVP Worldwide (Viking owner) has POOR CASH FLOW ISSUES. The reason you aren't receiving your service parts is because they are constantly being put on credit hold by their suppliers. At the next big convention, you need to hit the CEO between the eyes about their poor credit and cash flow. Do a Dunn&Bradstreet and you'll see how poorly they are rated. If it already takes 3 to 6 months to get parts from Asia, add credit hold to the situation and you really have an issue. NOTHING is produced or made in the States.

    You're being taken on a ride folks. You're not buying the quality Swedish unit that you remember from the past. You're buying CHEAP JUNK with the Viking name. It's like buying a Chevy Vega with an Acura nameplate slapped on it. You're being treated as fools.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for all this info! Most people who purchase a Viking do so because of the fine reputation of the Swedish made machines

      Delete
    2. It's not only Viking, SVP Worldwide inc owns also Singer and Pfaff trademarks.

      Delete
  26. Danny I have a Viking opal 650. It has tension problems also. And it is clunky sounding also. I bought mine used, but was told it was essentially brand new. I feel like I was duped, as the shop closed one month later. I am now going to have to take it to another shop that does not sell Vikings for service. If I could buy a new machine of a different brand I sure would..

    ReplyDelete
  27. \\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\
    DO NOT PURCHASE A VIKING OR PFAFF MACHINE UNTIL YOU READ THESE FACTS!! part 1
    //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////


    1. ARE VIKING AND PFAFF STILL PART OF HUSQVARNA?
    NO - Husqvarna, the inventor and creative talented brain trust behind these legendary sewing machines sold the Pfaff an Viking division to a holding company called Kohlberg about four years ago. Husqvarna is gone.

    2. WILL HUSQVARNA SUPPORT MY SEWING MACHINES?
    NO – You will ONLY get support from Kohlberg’s satellite company called SVP Worldwide which knows NOTHING about the sewing machines or market needs. Kohlberg bought them with the hopes to strip it down and sell it off but it’s been a dismal failure so far. In my opinion, holding companies are not in the business to support their customers. They actually could care less about you. They are in the business to “strip and sell” or use it as a way to hide revenue away from the IRS to avoid paying taxes.

    3. ARE THE SEWING MACHINES STILL PRODUCED IN SWEDEN WITH SWEDISH WORKMANSHIP?
    NO – This is the biggie. As soon as the holding company made the purchase from Husqvarna, they immediately shut down and ceased all Swedish operations which included manufacturing, engineering, quality and product development. There is a sales office and some limited engineering but mostly for the European market NOT the U.S. The many many years of fine Swedish craftsmanship that you remember from previous machines no longer exist. Nada. Gone.

    4. THEN WHERE IN EUROPE ARE THEY MANUFACTURING VIKING AND PFAFF?
    NOWHERE IN EUROPE – Here’s the embarrassing truth. Management saw a greedy opportunity to take these high quality brand name sewing machines AND SOURCE THEM CHEAPLY TO CHINA AND VIETNAM. The intent was to sell a cheap machine but slap it with a brand name like Viking or Pfaff to make you THINK you’re buying a quality machine. Could not be more from the truth. This is why you’re having quality issues.

    5. DID THEY SETUP UP NEW MANUFACTURING FACILITIES IN CHINA AND VIETNAM?
    NO – For Singer yes, they have Singer manufacturing in Shanghai but for Viking and Pfaff, NO – They are SUBCONTRACTED to existing China and Vietnam manufacturers who were only producing cheap machines for their Asian market. The intent was to make cheap machines with a quality brand name and charge you a high margin to make you THINK you’re buying quality. This is why you are having quality issues and why the machines lack the “feel” and “finesse” from the previous Swedish machines. Asian manufacturers have no idea about the Swedish sewing machine history or their craftsmanship and could really care less. Your Viking and Pfaff machines are nothing more than cheap commodities now.
    6. WHAT U.S. STATE IS THE HEADQUARTERS FOR SVP WORLDWIDE?
    NONE! – Ready for this – They are headquartered in BERMUDA. That’s right BERMUDA. Red flags pop up yet? They should. Bermuda has no manufacturing and the address is probably some vacant office with a great view of the Bermuda shoreline so the fat cats from this sham company can smoke big cigars and drink margaritas by the ocean front. Again, this is owned by a HOLDING COMPANY NOT A TRUE SEWING MACHINE MANUFACTURER. In my opinion, they have no intent to truly understand your sewing world. They purchased these divisions to play shenanigan games so they can avoid paying taxes NOT support sewing. They were hoping to be out of the sewing business by now but that plan went up in smoke.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for providing this info! A word to the wise...keep away from these clunkers!

      Delete
  28. \\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\
    DO NOT PURCHASE A VIKING OR PFAFF MACHINE UNTIL YOU READ THESE FACTS!! part 2

    /////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

    7. WHAT EFFECT DOES IT HAVE IF THESE MACHINES ARE SUBCONTRACTED AND ON SERVICE PARTS?

    HUGE EFFECT! – Most manufacturers design their own product and provide prints and specs to have outside manufacturing suppliers MAKE their components for them. They will have a combination of buying service parts overseas as well as setup domestic suppliers as anchors on the SAME CRITICAL PARTS in cases of small demand, demand spikes and quality issues. This means your machine will not be down long because a local manufacturer could provide the same critical part in a pinch so you’re not waiting for parts to arrive overseas which could take up to 90 days. SVP has NO domestic suppliers. They can’t because they DO NOT OWN THEIR UNITS. They have no prints or specs. If there’s any spikes, quality issues, bad inventory counts or parts left out of the sewing machine box, YOU’RE SCREWED. It all comes from overseas which is why they can’t stay supplied with critical service parts. Once they cut a purchase order to the Asian manufacturer, who knows how long it will take. Do they have stock? Does the Asian manufacturer need to go to his Asian supplier and if so, how long will it take? Does that Asian supplier have stock and if not how long will it take them to get the material? Where are they located? Yada yada yada. See how long it stretches out the lead time and it’s a guessing game when they will arrive. Imagine when it’s a quality issue. You waited 90 days for your critical service part to arrive and when it does arrive, IT’S DEFECTIVE. Welcome to the nightmare. You now have another 90 days for good parts and who knows if those are good. They are no longer designed in house. You’re best strategy is “hope and pray”.

    I could provide more but I will stop here. My best advice is to do research BEFORE you make an expensive purchase and KNOW who is making your machine. I’m not a fan of holding companies because I feel they don’t have your true good intentions in mind. Their business model is severely flawed and their strategy to me is to market cheap units at a high price. The CEO and senior management at SVP Worldwide are a joke. They’re all ego, arrogance and phony charisma with no substance. Get’s old doesn’t it? You’ll see through it soon.

    GOOD LUCK!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mr. Webster, I have copied off your comments … I'm having real issues with my HV Sapphire 875. Would you share where you found the very revealing information you have given in your above comments? I would really love documentation …. the local HV people probably won't take my "Dan Webster" from "Mommy for Reals" blog seriously. While I do not doubt anything you say, I would love to be able to produce real documentation. Many Thanks!

      Delete
  29. Wow, I wish I had seen this site long ago. I purchased my Husqvarna Viking SAPPHIRE™ 875 in 2012 and was truly loving the machine. I sewed both apparel and did quilting with the machine. This spring, all of a sudden I had issues with the tension (long loopy threads underneath — top stitching looked fine). I went online and followed all the suggestions (rethread, rewind bobbin, new needle, clean out under the plate). I brought it to my local JoAnn which has a HV center and had it sent out to repair. A week later it came back and, after only a few minutes sewing the same issue appeared. I had the machine sent out again. When it was returned, I was able to sew two little dresses and one quilt top and then, again, the problem is back. Tomorrow I will be bringing the machine back a third time. Since April, I have sewed more on my old $300 Singer machine than on this beautiful $1700 machine. Has anyone else had this issue?

    ReplyDelete
  30. My Viking story is from ancient history, but applies to the new Viking machines. I wish I could get the model number from the beast, but it's 2 floors down from where I am now. I can say it was the high-end machine of its day, and it was the last Viking without *any* electronic parts. The next model let you decide whether the machine would leave the needle up out of the work or down in it. And it was one of the no-need-to-lubricate machines (brilliant idea) which did not show you how to lubricate the machine, because "you never need to lubricate this Viking". How? Because their engineers had developed a system of porous "sintered" metal bearings that were filled with a lubricant that was stiff at room temperature but liquified as soon as friction built up some heat in the bearing. It "regelled" at room temp. Or so went their insufficiently tested theory. Perhaps it worked for them once or twice, but in the real world of my sewing room, the lubricating gell turned to gum, stiff, sticky gell. So I had to take it into the dealer to have a complete service done, for almost $200. Did I forget to mention that this was in the late seventies, and $200 would have paid your mortgage and left change for a dinner out. Worked fine, no, wait! It's starting again!!! That's right, it kept coming back with the same lubricating system and, guess what? It failed again, and again, and AGAIN. I am so sick if this machine that I would kick it all the way from Berkeley, California to Sweden, if that would do any good.

    Were HV to act responsibly, they would take back this lemon, give me my purchase price adjusted for inflation. And offer to give - yes GIVE - me whatever machine that suited my fancy. But I guess I'm being greedy. So, no freeby machine, but I do think that reimbursing me for my repairs should be included.

    Thank you for listening to me. I get so..... (Fill in the blank as you wish).... I could spit.

    ReplyDelete
  31. http://ofbearsandbutterflies.wordpress.com/2014/09/23/open-letter-to-husqvarna-viking/ There's my letter... in a 20 page downloadable form. I'm in an equal nightmare only I bought their embroidery machine for much more $$$$. I can't get a contact address for them because they refuse to work with me and tell me just to go to my local store, but the local store is currently not responding to me... what a nightmare! How/who did you contact for this to get a resolution?

    ReplyDelete
  32. I have just found what I believe is THE design flaw responsible for our frustration with our Husqvarna Viking Sapphire 870 Quilt machines.
    Could you help me with my research?
    I have spent 4 years of frustration - being told first that it needed a different 'up-take lever' with a cover (to prevent the thread jumping out, then the problem continuing - which should have been a recall)
    I have consistently been told that I'm using the wrong thread, the wrong needle, not adjusting the tension correctly (this machine is supposed to adjust it's own tension!) I have spent hundreds of dollars on threads, needles etc.
    My issue has been shredding and breaking the top thread before it gets to the needle. If I use a fine, strong and lovely thread on the top and bottomline thread on the bottom, SOMETIMES it works like a dream. However, it's the inconsistency that drives me nuts.

    THE IMPORTANT BIT: I believe that the cause of the problem is that the thread is getting caught at the junction of the main front part of the machine, and the back of the machine - where the thread goes between the uptake lever and the needle. If you're brave enough, take the plastic piece that is clipped on (between the tension disc and the uptake lever - just press on that piece at the top and it will release the clip behind the back section, and press gently forward. It should come toward you - Or ask your mechanic to do it for you).
    Alternatively, if you gently lie the machine down on its back, look at where the thread goes from the uptake lever department to the needle, and my guess is that your thread will be rubbing in the back corner to the right of the uptake lever cavity. I believe it's getting shredded there, or caught there. It does not allow us to use the beautiful threads that we should be able to use, or any of the lovely stitches we want to do. We're merely sewing for survival.

    I am going to place the picture of what I see as the problem as my profile pic on my Facebook page.If you could take a photo of what yours looks like to prove or disprove my theory, it would help with my research - and may help other quilters. It should also help HV to be accountable. Please private message my Facebook page (Julie Hahn - with the photo of the sewing machine needle) or email me at juliehahn21@gmail.com . I've been trying to find a way to contact Husqvarna directly, but cannot find contact details apart from via a dealer - and it is not their problem.

    ReplyDelete
  33. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
  34. Just want to say I purchased a Sapphire 875 in 2012. I am a quilter and avid seamstress. It is the most expensive machine I have purchased. I paid cash, hard earned and was excited. BUT, I had the very same issues with tension. I have pulled out countless threads. At the time I was suffering PTSD and couldn't bear to deal with this problem in store, so I did what I always do: I Googled it. I found that I was not the only one AND THEN I found a possible solution...I saw a you tube video on how to change the bobbin tension. It was time consuming and tedious but it has provided the results I needed. I couldn't afford a new machine. It has been a labor of love (much like most sewing is). I wouldn't say that I'm pleased with Viking's bobbin issues, but I am getting very nice stitches now. I sell my work and it is important to me that the top stitching looks great. The tool I use for my eyeglasses is my best friend. It is just the right size to tweak the bobbin case screws, which is where the problem lies.

    If you want to salvage your sanity...please google and check fixing bobbin tension manually. 2 years later and sewing has been a great healer. Good Luck!

    ReplyDelete
  35. I have a Viking Saphire 870 Quilt that is about 3 1/2 years old. The machine didn't get used right away because I was diagnosed with breast cancer right after I got it and didn't feel like sewing while undergoing surgery and cancer treatment. When I finally felt like getting the machine back out I was really disapointed in this expensive machine. I have had tension issues and thread nests. The automatic thread cutter has never worked right. The dealer I bought it from is no longer in the home sewing machine business. I finally found a dealer in a town almost 2 hours from my home. I left the machine with her for several weeks. She replaced the thread cutter motor and got the tension problem fixed. It sews a perfect stitch now, but it makes more noise than my antique Singer. That is disappointing, but at least it sews. The repair bill was $348 because it was out of warranty. It had never worked right since I bought it, but since I didn't buy it from her, there was nothing she could do about it. I'm just glad I got it fixed. I will never buy another Viking machine and I wouldn't recommend them to anyone.

    ReplyDelete
  36. To those of you in Australia, our Consumer Affairs department of the government are really helpful on this issue. We ARE protected from machines that do serve the purpose for which they are purchased. I believe the USA have similar laws.

    ReplyDelete
  37. Oh my goodness!!! Here it is 2015 and NOW I find this article! ugh! Wish I had found this out back in 2013 when I was suckered in to buying the Sapphire 875. Talk about buyer's remorse!! My machine worked beautifully for the first 6 months or so though I didn't use it a ton. The tension was on and off an issue. Just this past week however, it finally gave up the ghost.....rats nests EVERWHERE!!! I so hate this machine I cannot even speak of it. I just want to sell it and move on. I knew I should have bought a Janome 8900....it was calling my name but my hubs looked at the price and almost fainted. Can't say I blame him there. So, here I am, having overpaid to begin with for this stupid machine. No Husqvarna repair folks anywhere...BUYER BEWARE!!! This company is awful...I have no recourse and they are laughing all the way to the bank with our cash. Shameful.

    Thanks Mr. Webster for your insight on Pfaff as well, I had looked at those too and am glad to know not to even go near it.

    Glad for validation anyway...just sorry I hadn't come across it before.....

    ReplyDelete
  38. And I was looking to buy the 670.... will look at Janime now...

    thank you all

    ReplyDelete
  39. Hi Danny. I hate my Husqvarna Viking 385. Never ending drama. My solution was to go vintage. I have a necchi bu Mira and viking 2 as daily machines. Both all metal. Work with no issues. See anything. For fmq, I use my singer 15 clone, but both the viking and necchi do a great job. All together...the three machines cost me $500.

    ReplyDelete
  40. Oops. Meant to say my Sapphire 870. I hate it so much I can't remember the model.lol

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. heartbroken January 16, 2016

      My experience parallels danny's experience (moomyforreals), even to the point of buying a Juki 2010Q and absolutely loving that machine for piecing quilts and doing awesomely perfect straight stitches. Outstanding ergonomic features as well. But the Viking - never again.

      Delete
  41. Hi Danny, Wow I can't believe what you went through. I worked there for 3 years, and know every single machine like it were my own, and i own an 835.. i know clarissa, and i wish i would have worked there then. do you still have this machine?

    thanks
    mari Mezzatesta

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I don't. I traded it in to MulQueen for a Juki TL-2010Q.

      Delete
  42. I just bought a viking sewing machine 690Q and it has an automatic thread cutter. After changing my bobbin it will no longer cut the bobbin thread. I have tried everything to cleaning, re-threading the needle and rewinding the bobbin. Anyone know what else to do to get it to work properly?

    ReplyDelete
  43. Have a Viking embroidery machine. When I moved, my memory stick (operating system for this really expensive machine) was lost. I contacted HV and they said, in essence, wow, tough cookies. We can't help you but we can give you the number of a Viking dealer near you that will sell you a replacement memory stick for $700.....Or, why don't you consider trading in your useless machine for
    $500 (lose thousands) and put the money towards another POS that we won't support. NAWWWWW. Sticking with Janome. they have REAL customer service. BE WARNED PEOPLE!!!!!

    ReplyDelete
  44. Wish I'd found this blog site before I bought my Husqvarna Viking 690Q last year. I have been having "bird nesting" issues since it was new only to be told its "user error". Unlike everyone else though its a great FMQ machine and stuffs up on straight stitching the most, takes me about ten attempts to get it sewing then it works fine for the rest of the day only to have to go though it all over again the next time I start sewing. About to take mine back AGAIN to the store I bought it from, unfortunately its out of warranty now by a few days. I have complained about it every time I've been to the store for a year now. Wish I'd stuck with Janome like my last two machines, thought Husqvarna was better quality! What a joke!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nanalyn, I'm really sorry to hear that! I want to help you, I worked for the company selling machine's in Arizona, and if your store is anything like these, yes you are not going to get the help you really need. I had a big following on the only day I worked and soon the manager started accusing me of promising them special things to get them to only come to me. Well I soon quit, they didn't like the fact that I went out of my way to treat and to help people so they were happy! Tough!
      Your Viking 960q should never bird nest! It has to be user error, they should have spent as much time as needed to find out why it was happening.
      Reach out to me on Etsy/shop/Colormepinkbutiqe send me a conversation and I will help you get this thing resolved. I can even send you videos on what to do and how. And what it shouldnt do?
      Sorry Hun!! ❤️❤️ God Bless
      Mari M.

      Delete
  45. Danny - I truly feel sorry for your unsatisfactory Husqvarna experience. I have owned four Huskies and loved every one of them. No major issues. And I sew a LOT. However, I do have to take issue with one of your statements about Vera and her replacement. You state that there is no way to change the bobbin tension in these machines. Well yes, there is actually. It's not complicated and it can be done by anyone. All bobbin cases have a tension screw no matter if it is a machine with a front-loading or top-loading bobbin. You just turn the screw - righty tighty; lefty-loosey. This will work on any sewing machine. My current go-to machine is a Ruby which is basically a Sapphire with the embroidery capability added. I can adjust any tension endlessly but the really interesting thing is that I rarely need to. No machine can perform every task perfectly with no adjustments. There are just too many variables. And that is why they give us the ability to tweak upper and lower thread tensions, presser foot pressure etc. I am very sad that you were not able to have a positive experience with a Husqvarna sewing machine and wish you luck with your present and future machines.

    ReplyDelete
  46. Jeanne- Great informational blog. Looking for a new machine- My Elna is 50+ years old, thousands of miles on her and me. So a major treat for me with new machine but this time I am doing my research first. Happy quilting to you all.

    ReplyDelete
  47. Danny, Your Husqvarna sounds just like mine. In less than a year it has been in for service 3 times costing about $100 each time. My trusted repairman always says the same thing, it just needed cleaning and tension adjustment. It causes me lots of anxiety and ripping of seams and broken threads (I too am an aurifil faithful) I have said for years that I just want a straight stich workhorse. I have had my eye on the Juki TL2010Q and I think you have convinced me. I quilt 3 days a week for my etsy shop and can't spend hours frustrated with my equipment.

    ReplyDelete
  48. Very interesting Danny to read your issues with your Viking 690Q. I am facing the same problem with a 1 month old machine. Yours sounded, as mine, like a major problem. Under the Husqvarna warranty, a major fault allows a full refund. I am giving them one week to fix my machine and before taking it home, have it tested at the shop. If it fails as before, I will be asking for a full refund per my right under Consumer law. We as customers have rights as with any product complaint.
    Terri

    ReplyDelete
  49. I am so glad I did not trade my old HViking Designer SE or Designer Diamond in on a newer, more expensive machine (since I have invested in my sewing machine feet as heavily as I have). After reading this blog, if and when my HV machines die, I will change what brand I sew with. Oh, I have my HV #1 from years ago - last all metal insides, and a Singer Genie, a 3/4 head sewing machine, and they all work. Light bulb moment: No wonder Viking stores are closing in my area.

    ReplyDelete
  50. Just my two cents worth. About 10-12 years ago I was a new empty nester and I bought an HV Scandanavia 200. It was an economy, limited edition machine but more money than I had ever spent on myself let alone a sewing machine. I never regretted it and now I have replaced it with a used Sapphire 835 who is my new love! No problems...purrs like a kitten.

    There is no excuse for bad service and just like with any machine..car or otherwise..there is such a thing as a lemon. When I started sewing, Singer and Kenmore were the standard and I swore by them...then about 25 yrs ago that changed. You couldn't pay me to own one. I've had several Brother machines and sewn on a few Pfaff machines. I love my HV sewing experiences best. I've not had any negative experience with the company because I've had no reason to contact them. My heart goes out to all have had such terrible experiences. I just wanted to add another perspective.



    ReplyDelete

Comments make my day! Seriously. I love them.

Related Posts Plugin